Law and Public Policy

America’s Reach: The Constitutionality of Targeted Killing

On Friday, April 6, 2012 I will be participating in a debate at The University of California, Davis School of Law.  The topic is “America’s Reach:  The Constitutionality of Targeted Killing.”  The speech is sponsored by the ACLU and the Federalist Society.  For more on this issue, see my article Kill-Lists and Accountability.

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Law and Public Policy

Does the NDAA Permit the Detention of U.S. Citizens?

On Tuesday, April 3, 2012 I will be participating in a debate at The University of Houston Law Center.  I’ve posted details from the flyer below.

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Law and Public Policy

Emerging Issues in International Humanitarian Law: Santa Clara Law

On Friday February 3 and Saturday February 4th the Santa Clara Law school will host a symposium on International Humanitarian Law.  I will be serving as a moderator for Panel 3.  The full schedule appears below, and more information about the symposium can be found here.

The 2012 Santa Clara Journal of International Law Symposium- Emerging Issues in International Humanitarian Law

Friday, February 3 and Saturday, February 4, 2012

HOSTED BY:
Santa Clara University School of Law
Santa Clara Journal of International Law
Center for Global Law & Policy

Symposium Schedule

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Law and Public Policy

Lawfare on my Targeting and Collateral Damage Article

LawfareLogo

Ben Wittes, writing at Lawfare was kind enough to pen a write-up on my empirical paper The U.S. Practice of Collateral Damage Estimation and Mitigation.  I consider this a high honor.  Here is Ben’s take:

Whatever your view of the merits of targeted killing, this article, in my view at least, will enrich your understanding of the way targeting is done. It should be required reading for anyone participating in the many debates surrounding targeted killing. While it deals only with the military, not the CIA, and only with strikes that are reviewed in advance–and thus does not present a complete picture of U.S. targeting practices–it does give a rich sense of the methodological care and seriousness with which the military approaches the problem of collateral damage.

Check out the full post here.

For more on this issue, see my article Kill-Lists and Accountability.

 

 

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Law and Public Policy

What the Future Holds: Balancing Law, Liberty and National Security

On Friday November 4, 2011 The Florida International Law Review will host their Fall 2011 Symposium.  The topic is What the Future Holds: Balancing Law, Liberty and National Security.  I will be participating in Panel III- Looking Back to Shape the Future: How Foreign Policy will Affect Law, Liberty and National Security.

Here is the symposium teaser:
The rise of transnational terrorism and evolving threats to the national security of the United States has forced remarkable changes in United States foreign and domestic policy. The United States’ various strategies and policies for coping with these threats are celebrated by some and rejected by others. This symposium will focus on the law as well as related policy, political, and societal implications of national security policy. How do we balance liberty and individual freedoms with national security in today’s America? Where do we go from here?

The full schedule appears after the break.

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Law and Public Policy

Accountability for Collateral Damage in Targeted Killings

On Tuesday, October 25, 2011 I will be presenting my paper Collateral Damage and Accountability at Santa Clara University School of Law.  The event will take place at noon and is open to the public.  For more on this issue, see my article Kill-Lists and Accountability.

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Law and Public Policy

Bush v. Obama on Counterterrorism Policy

On Tuesday, October 4th I will be part of a panel at Mercer University School of Law.  The panel discussion will explore the differences between President Obama and President Bush’s national security policies, specifically as they relate to counterterrorism.  Some issues we will explore are:

  1. Commentary on how successful the current program has been in achieving its objectives
  2. Changes that might need to be implemented to make the terror policy more effective and/or efficient
  3. Specific weaknesses that make the program less effective than it might otherwise be
  4. The continued viability, legality, and future of holding terror suspects at Guantanamo Bay and even other “black sites” in some European nations
  5. How do we balance the needs to secure ourselves with the freedoms we enjoy as citizens.
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