Blog, Law, law enforcement, privacy

University of Washington: Drones, Privacy, and Surveillance

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On Thursday November 1st, at 12 noon I will be making a presentation entitled Drones on the Homefront: Privacy at Risk?  This presentation is based on my paper Drones and Privacy Governance, a short abstract of that paper appears below. 

Unmanned systems (drones) and other technological innovations raise serious questions about modern conceptions of privacy. This paper examines the constitutional doctrine related to aerial surveillance and technology, and finds that current doctrine is unlikely to prevent the use of unmanned systems. The paper next addresses calls to create a statutory requirement that will subject the use of unmanned systems to the warrant requirement. These calls are rejected because they fail to protect privacy, while unnecessarily hampering legitimate law enforcement efforts. To best protect privacy, the paper suggests various mechanisms of democratically centered privacy governance, and a regulatory regime to govern the use of unmanned systems. The paper’s appendix includes a model bill appropriate for adoption by cities, states, and the federal government. The bill outlines the various privacy governance measures discussed in the body of the paper. 

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Blog, Law, privacy

OU Law School Presentation on Drones and Privacy

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On Thursday October 4th at 12pm I will be making a presentation based on my paper Drones and Privacy Governance.  The event will be open to the public and refreshments will be served.  

Here is the abstract of my paper: 

 Unmanned systems (drones) and other technological innovations raise serious questions about modern conceptions of privacy. This paper examines the constitutional doctrine related to aerial surveillance and technology, and finds that current doctrine is unlikely to prevent the use of unmanned systems. The paper next addresses calls to create a statutory requirement that will subject the use of unmanned systems to the warrant requirement. These calls are rejected because they fail to protect privacy, while unnecessarily hampering legitimate law enforcement efforts. To best protect privacy, the paper suggests various mechanisms of democratically centered privacy governance, and a regulatory regime to govern the use of unmanned systems. The paper’s appendix includes a model bill appropriate for adoption by cities, states, and the federal government. The bill outlines the various privacy governance measures discussed in the body of the paper. 

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Blog, Law

Drones on the Homefront: Privacy At Risk?

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On Tuesday, August 28th at 12 noon I will be presenting at The University of Denver, Sturm College of Law and on Wednesday, August 29th at 9am I will be making the same presentation at The University of Wyoming, College of Law.

The panel is entitled Drones on the Homefront: Privacy at Risk?

My remarks are based in part on my work-in-progress, Drones and Privacy Governance.

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Blog, Law, Policy

Unmanned Systems and Privacy (Drones on the Homefront)

On Wednesday August 8th, 2012 I will be appearing at AUVSI’s Unmanned Systems North America Conference.  My panel, Getting in Front of the Issue: A Discussion on Unmanned Systems and Privacy will feature a discussion about the increasing use of unmanned aircraft by public safety officials, federal government agencies and commercial entities.  We will address questions regarding the legality of UAS data collection and the implications of UAS operations on privacy protection.

Speakers include:

  • Moderator: Mr. Alan Frazier:University of North Dakota,
  • Panelist: Mr. Matthew Henshon: Henshon Parker, LLP,
  • Panelist: Mr. Benjamin Miller:Mesa County Sheriff’s Office,
  • Panelist: Mr. Chris Calabrese: American Civil Liberties Union,
  • Panelist: Mr. Douglas Marshall: TAAC/New Mexico State University,
  • Panelist: Mr. Gregory McNeal: Pepperdine University School of Law,
  • Panelist: Mr. John Villasenor: The Brookings Institution

For a primer on the implications of unmanned system usage inside the U.S. see: A Primer on Domestic Drones: Legal, Policy, and Privacy Implications.  My remarks are based in part on my work-in-progress, Drones and Privacy Governance.

 

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