McNeal To Moderate White House Drone Policy Session

White House Office Of Science And Technology Policy Event Will Focus On Future Regulations

Dr. Gregory S. McNeal was selected by the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy to co-moderate a policy workshop discussion with participants from academia, industry and government.

McNeal Drone Policy White House Office of Science and Technology Policy

The daylong event will begin at the White House and will then move to the Newseum for drone flight demonstrations and policy discussions.  The event, billed as “The First-Ever OSTP Workshop on Drones and the Future of Aviation” will:

bring together government, academic, and industry stakeholders to discuss both the near and long-term implications of unmanned aircraft as an emergent technology; issues related to airspace integration; the potential of unmanned aircraft to enable high-impact research, create new jobs and industries, save lives, and improve the way government agencies and companies do business; and potential ways to further address safety, security, and privacy in this emerging field.

Dr. McNeal’s session will focus on issues related to the future of U.S. drone regulations. McNeal and a group of government facilitators will help identify challenge areas related to regulation and issues where industry leadership or cross-sector collaboration will prove useful in enabling small UAS integration.  Discussion topics will range from immediate-term implementation challenges for Part 107 and other near-term rulemakings, waiver reform, technical solutions for notice of operations, beyond visual line of sight (BVLOS) operations, nighttime flight, operations over people, and more.

Dr. McNeal is Professor of Law & Public Policy at Pepperdine University School of Law and is co-founder of AirMap which provides safety solutions for drones.  Dr. McNeal was previously appointed by the Secretary of Transportation to serve on the UAS Registration Task Force and was appointed by the FAA Administrator to serve on the Micro UAS Aviation Rulemaking Committee.  In addition to his work in support of policymaking, Dr. McNeal serves as Chair of the Consumer Technology Association’s Industry Standards Working Group on Unmanned Aircraft Systems (R6 WG 23) and as a voting member of the ASTM technical committee creating scientific standards to govern unmanned aircraft and their operation.

A report conveying the event’s proceedings will be produced by the Association for Unmanned Vehicle Systems International Foundation and will be released to the public to inform policymaking.

Commercial Drones Cleared For Takeoff

Drone Law Expert And Scholar Dr. Gregory McNeal Appears On NBC's Today Show To Discuss Drones

Set to go into effect in August, the new rule will allow thousands of entrepreneurs and small businesses to innovate exciting new ways to use drones. While rule allows for daytime operations within visual line-of-sight with limited external load operations, it is a big step towards a future in which we receive Amazon packages by drone.

Drone law and policy expert Dr. Gregory McNeal discussing Part 107 regulations on The Today Show.

Pepperdine Law Professor and AirMap co-founder Greg McNeal weighed in on TODAY, with NBC’s Tom Costello reporting.

“This is the FAA doing something that they’ve really never done before, which is to create a permissive, progressive environment that makes it easy for people to be able to operate,” he said. “[Companies like Amazon] have to keep the pressure on the FAA, but there’s still hope for them to be able to have this dream of package delivery.”

McNeal Appointed to FAA Rulemaking Committee

Gregory McNeal to Work with Industry Stakeholders to Develop Regulatory Framework for Micro UAS

Professor Gregory McNeal, who is also the co-founder of AirMap, was appointed to the Federal Aviation Administration’s (FAA) Micro Unmanned Aircraft Systems Aviation Rulemaking Committee. Dr. McNeal was selected by the FAA and the Small UAV Coalition to work with other aviation experts to draft recommended performance-based standards and operation requirements for a new classification of UAS called micro UAS.  “I am pleased to be a part of the FAA’s efforts to establish regulatory guidance to this new class of UAS,” said Dr. McNeal, “Our industry is continuously evolving and I applaud the FAA for taking an inclusive approach to the rulemaking process.”

MicroUAS Aviation Rulemaking CommitteeDr. McNeal has been at the forefront of the intersection between technology, law and policy; he is one of the nation’s leading experts on public policy and unmanned aircraft. He delivered the keynote address at last week’s American Association of Airport Executives Airport Planning Design & Construction Symposium, the preeminent technical event for airport professionals. Additionally, Dr. McNeal will testify before the U.S. Senate Committee on Small Business and Entrepreneurship on March 10, 2016 at a hearing entitled, “Up in the Air: Examining the Commercial Applications of Unmanned Aircraft for Small Businesses.”

Dr. McNeal will be a featured presenter at the South by Southwest (SXSW) Interactive Conference in Austin, Texas on March 15, 2016. Along with the FAA’s Senior Advisor on UAS Integration and other thought-leaders, Dr. McNeal will discuss key policy issues impacting drones including privacy and safety, at a session called “Policies Impacting Drones and the Future of Flight.”

“Despite being in the news regularly, most people are unaware of the significant economic and societal benefits that drone technologies offer. I look forward to being a part of an effort to educate the SXSW community about the latest drone advancements and the effect public policy has on the growth of this industry,” said Dr. McNeal.

The Policies Impacting Drones and the Future of Flight panel will take place on March 15th at 3:30pm CST at SXSW Interactive at the Parkside in Austin, Texas.

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McNeal To Lead Industry Working Group For Small Drones

CTA R6WG23 To Write Industry Consensus Standards

CTA Gregory McNeal drone law expert industry standardsDr. Gregory S. McNeal has been named as the chair of the Consumer Technology Association’s working group for small drones. The group will develop standards, recommended practices, and technical reports related to small unmanned aerial systems. Dr. McNeal has experience working to create industry standards, he served as a member of the FAA’s MicroUAS Aviation Rulemaking Committee and Registration Task Force and is a member of ASTM Committee F.38.

“I’m pleased to work collaboratively with industry and government stakeholders to help create consensus standards that can create a sustainable future for the industry” said McNeal.

Small drones have grown in popularity as a unique tool for aerial inspections, entertainment, journalism, search and rescue, and many other beneficial uses. Soon, millions of drones will be operating billions of flights and will deliver tremendous value to people in their everyday lives. AirMap is committed to ensuring that future comes about, and is proud to work collaboratively with other industry stakeholders to help develop standards and best practices for the operation and management of small unmanned aerial systems.

The new working group’s first project will be to focus on establishing a standard for serial numbers to be used by small drones, which will help streamline drone registrations with the FAA. The working group is part of CTA’s Portable, Handheld and In-Vehicle Electronics Committee.

To learn more about AirMap’s recommendations for a future system for registration, download the white paper on “Robust and Scalable UAS Registration.”

TESTIMONY: The Commercial Applications of Unmanned Aircraft for Small Businesses

Hearing Before The Senate Committee on Small Business and Entrepreneurship

Senate Testimony Regarding Drones and EntrepreneurshipOn March 10, 2016 I testified before the Senate Committee on Small Business and Entrepreneurship, the hearing was entitled, “Up in the Air: Examining the Commercial Applications of Unmanned Aircraft for Small Businesses.”

A copy of my testimony can be downloaded here.

McNeal Named To FAA’s Registration Task Force

The Federal Aviation Administration has announced the 25-member task force that will advise the administration on its proposed drone registration rules.

Dr. Gregory S. McNeal (first on right) stands on stage with Secretary of Transportation Foxx during the announcement of the Drone Registration Task Force.

Dr. Gregory S. McNeal (first on right) stands on stage with Secretary of Transportation Foxx during the announcement of the Drone Registration Task Force.

Dr. Gregory S. McNeal has been named to the Federal Aviation Administration’s Registration Task Force.  The 25-member group will advise the administration on its proposed drone registration rules. Department of Transportation (DOT) Secretary Anthony Foxx has set a deadline of Nov. 20 for the Task Force to complete its recommendations and work is already underway. The group will meet formally from Nov. 3-5 before developing recommendations on a streamlined registration process and minimum requirements on which unmanned aircraft should be registered. Given the urgency of this issue, the DOT and FAA will move expeditiously to consider the Task Force’s recommendations.

The group is composed of experts from drone manufacturers, aviation associations, retailers and others, providing a good variety of perspectives.

The FAA says the group’s co-chairs are Dave Vos of GoogleX and Earl Lawrence, director of the FAA’s Unmanned Aircraft Systems Integration Office. Here are the members:

Nancy Egan – 3D Robotics, General Counsel
Richard Hanson – Academy of Model Aeronautics, Government and Regulatory Affairs Director
George Novak – Aerospace Industries Association, Assistant Vice President and Regulatory Counsel
Chuck Hogeman, Aviation Safety Chair, and Randy Kenagy, Manager, Engineering & Operations – Air Line Pilots Association
Jim Coon – Aircraft Owners and Pilots Association, Senior Vice President, Government Affairs & Advocacy
Sean Cassidy – Amazon Prime Air, Director, Strategic Partnerships
Ben Gielow – Amazon Retail, Senior Manager, Public Policy
Justin Towles – American Association of Airport Executives, Staff Vice President
Brian Wynne – Association of Unmanned Vehicle Systems International, President and CEO
Parker Brugge – Best Buy, Senior Director, Government Relations
Douglas Johnson – Consumer Electronics Association, Vice President, Technology Policy
Brendan Schulman – DJI, Vice President of Policy & Legal Affairs
Paul Feldman – General Aviation Manufacturers Association, Vice President, Government Affairs
Dave Vos – GoogleX (Co-Chair)
Tony Bates – GoPro, President
Matt Zuccaro – Helicopter Association International, President
Mike Fergus – International Association of Chiefs of Police, Program Manager
John Perry – Management Association for Private Photogrammetric Surveyors
Brandon Declet – Measure, CEO
Randall Burdett – National Association of State Aviation Officials, Board of Directors
Sarah Wolf – National Business Aviation Association, Sr. Manager, Security & Facilitation
Baptiste Tripard – Parrot, Business Development
Tyler Collins – PrecisionHawk, Director of Business Development
Gregory McNeal – Small UAV Coalition, Co-founder of AirMap
Thomas Head – Walmart, Product Safety & Regulatory Compliance Manager

McNeal To Emcee Drone Entrepreneurship Conference

The Geoffrey H. Palmer Center for Entrepreneurship and the Law and Pepperdine University School of Law present the 2015 Drone Entrepreneurship Conference.

The Geoffrey H. Palmer Center for Entrepreneurship and the Law and Pepperdine University School of Law present The 2015 Drone Entrepreneurship Conference.

​Imagine the possibilities and explore new frontiers with tomorrow’s leaders in drone entrepreneurship. Special guest speaker Greg McNeal. Expert panels of speakers from startups, venture capitalists and leading law firms.Drone Entrepreneurship Conference

Drones and the Future of Aerial Surveillance

The George Washington Law Review

George_Washington_Law_Review_Drones_and_Privacy

Drones and the Future of Aerial Surveillance, George Washington Law Review.  

On February 15, 2015 the FAA announced historic regulations that for the first time in American history will allow small aircraft without onboard pilots — drones — to fly in the national airspace. Legal and technological developments have thus made it all but certain that drones will be a catalyst for new ways of thinking about privacy and surveillance. This is especially the case because the drones that the FAA has approved for operation in the national airspace (small aircraft under 55 pounds) are the exact type of drones that local law enforcement will be most likely to acquire and use. Thus, the battle over privacy and aerial surveillance will be fought in statehouses throughout the country. This article seeks to frame future discussions about how states will handle the privacy issues associated with aerial surveillance.

The article takes the counterintuitive position that technology may make unmanned aerial surveillance more protective of privacy than manned surveillance. It further argues that scholars and legislators should move beyond a warrant-based, technology centric approach to protecting privacy from aerial surveillance. Such an approach is unworkable, counterproductive, and may stifle efforts to enact more privacy protective legislative regimes. Instead, this article proposes that legal reforms should focus on excluding low altitude flights and surveillance coupled with imposing limits on persistent surveillance, requiring enhanced accountability procedures for data retention and access, and creating new transparency, accountability and oversight measures.

Know Before You Fly Campaign Integrates AirMap Airspace Information

Wildfire Flight Restrictions, Airport Airspace and Other Information Now Freely Available To Drone Operators

I am pleased to announce the integration of AirMap’s airspace information into the Know Before You Fly campaign.

Know Before You Fly is an education campaign founded by the Association for Unmanned Vehicle Systems International (AUVSI), the Academy of Model Aeronautics (AMA), and the Small UAV Coalition in partnership with the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) to educate prospective users about the safe and responsible operation of unmanned aircraft systems (UAS).

As excitement and enthusiasm continues to grow around UAS, and the regulatory framework continues to take shape, more consumers are looking to buy UAS for personal use and more businesses are looking to use UAS too. These prospective operators want to fly, and fly safely, but many don’t realize that, just because you can buy a UAS, doesn’t mean you can fly it anywhere, or for any purpose. Know Before You Fly provides prospective users with the information and guidance they need to fly safely and responsibly.

Now with AirMap airspace information, the campaign can do even more to ensure that fliers can fly in a safe and responsible fashion.  As part of the campaign, AirMap is providing the following pieces of information:

Drone Flight Restriction Information By AirMap

As an example, you can see how AirMap provides live information about firefighting temporary flight restrictions (TFRs), ensuring that operators are aware of restrictions near wildfires.

AirMap AirSpace Info Firefighting Restriction For Drones

Check it out!

http://knowbeforeyoufly.org/air-space-map/

 

California’s Drone Trespass Bill Goes Too Far

California legislators are looking to tackle the perceived problem of drone trespasses with a modified version of a bill that was introduced earlier this year.  Unfortunately they’ve gone too far in the most recent version of the proposed legislation.

This bill was originally a privacy bill, and it was innovative when it was first introduced.  Because it was originally very narrowly tailored and focused on prohibiting trespasses in circumstances where a drone operator was violating a landowner’s expectation of privacy, it struck an appropriate balance between innovation and rights.  The bill was narrow and careful in that it required plaintiffs to prove a series of elements to make their case.  Requiring multiple elements of proof is important as it protects rights and guards against frivolous litigation.

Here is some of the original language from the preamble of the legislation when it was proposed earlier this year:

Existing law imposes liability for physical invasion of privacy, if a person knowingly enters onto the land of another without permission or otherwise commits a trespass in order to capture any image or recording of the plaintiff engaging in a private activity and the invasion is offensive to a reasonable person.  (my emphasis in bold)

The key here is that the original bill created a cause of action only when someone was trespassing for a very specific purpose — to violate one’s privacy.  The bill did this by modifying California’s existing physical invasion of privacy law.  If the bill had stayed as proposed, to prove a violation would require a plaintiff to prove not only that the drone entered the airspace above a person’s property without their permission, but also all of the following things:

  1. The operator knowingly violated the landowner’s rights, and 
  2. The operator captured any type of visual image, sound recording, or other physical impression of the plaintiff, and 
  3. That image or recording of the plaintiff showed them “engaging in a private, personal, or familial activity”, and
  4. The invasion of privacy was “in a manner that is offensive to a reasonable person.”

That’s a pretty sensible approach focused on privacy harms.  All four elements have to be proven, which means we won’t see spurious or vexatious litigation because the bar to litigation is high enough that someone isn’t going to sue unless their privacy was truly violated.  It also serves to protect First Amendment rights because it is narrowly tailored to address privacy harms, rather than being a broad ban on aerial imaging or the mere act of flying.

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